Jools Bloom has never been interested in depicting objects or scenes in the visual world. Her view is that photography best serves that purpose. She credits her initial studies in Ceramic Sculpture at Monash University with the formation of a material based approach to her painting.

"We all need an entry point to our art training and Sculpture was mine. I learnt a great deal about myself in relation to the creative psyche within Art History. I joined my heroes in their quest to uncover what is unique to myself and not imitative of others". For that reason she decided to undertake a second BA in Fine Art at RMIT. "I actually wondered why it took me so long to get to a canvas. But once there I felt absolutely in the right place and was grateful for all I had previously experienced. Plaster, clay and concrete were my transitional materials to paint". Instinctively she established a method of working that was intuitive and confident, based on the relationship of one surface of colour to the next. In these Under-Graduate years brushes were rarely used. Instead Bloom used rags or her hands to construct multi-layered compositions that ended with large, bold calligraphic marks forming the "full-stop" of the surface.

More obvious brush-work has entered her canvases in recent years."It's about moving forward and not being caught in a rut. I'm developing a new type of gesture in paint. Despite being highly constructed with brushstrokes I'm sure Jackson Pollock would still approve".

Having relocated from Melbourne, Jools Bloom is delighted by what she describes as 'a lively arts community beyond my expectations here in the Wodonga and Albury region'. Jools has spent a considerable amount of time working as a sculptor and she credits this to her bold, intuitive and confident painting style.

Most recently Blooms "Andromeda" or "Diamonds on the Pillow" (2011) point to a new direction of enquiry. Increasingly more highly pitched in colour these paintings tantalise with a hint of figuration. Not quite human, not quite animal. Strange creatures appear to live within the increasingly structured surface. The result is a body of work that stretches the abyss between dream and deferred memory. Childlike, even playful these works speak of an artist who is enjoying the journey and doesn't need to know the destination.

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